Explore 2018 theme

Our Voices, Our Future!

In 2018, we encourage students to be inspired by the theme Our Voices, Our Future! 

Our Voices, Our Future is about celebrating the voices of young people and empowering students to recognise that their voices matter. Young people are our future and every young person has a unique and important role to play in contributing their voices to reconciliation.

Our Voices, Our Future is also about acknowledging and valuing the place of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples voices and perspectives within Australia’s national story and reconciliation journey. It is about recognising the diversity and dynamism of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and contributions; celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages and knowledges and appreciating the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination and self-representation.

It is about recognising some of the ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices have been ignored or misrepresented in the past, and about creating a rightful place for the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to be  actively listened to – now and into the future.

This theme explores the importance of coming together and engaging in conversations and collaborations that build mutual respect, trust and understanding. It is about listening, speaking up and working together to create a better future.

Through exploration of this theme students will develop their understanding of the rich diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices and perspectives and the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination and self-representation in directing processes of reconciliation.

We encourage young people to dream big and share their visions for our future and see the power that they have to effect change within their school and local community through their listening, words and actions.


Considerations

It is important that teachers support students in developing or extending their understanding of the rich diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples voices, languages, cultures and perspectives across Australia.

For guidance around fostering cultural competence, safety and respect in the classroom read Culturally appropriate teaching and undertake the professional learning activity on Reconciliation Australia’s Narragunnawali platform.

We hope that teachers and students benefit from these resources and enjoy engaging in conversations, activities and the creation of art and writing in exploration of this year’s theme.

We look forward to receiving the students entries that reflect on, and provide a personal response to the theme Our Voices, Our Future!


How to use this website

We encourage teachers to explore this website and familiarise themselves with the content.

We suggest the following:

  • Register your school or as an individual student to participate in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge by emailing your schools name and contact information to schools@nswreconciliation.org.au
  • Read about Reconciliation in the Research section of this site.
  • Engage with the content and activities on the Explore 2018 Theme
  • Familiarise yourself with the Culturally Competent Teaching resources and guidelines.
  • Visit the Resources  page for links to lots of useful information and additional curriculum resources.
  • For information about how the Schools Reconciliation Challenge aligns with state curriculum objectives visit NSW curriculum
  • Check out the ‘Create Art’ and ‘Create Writing’ in the Create section of the website for teaching tips, lesson plans and activities to guide your students creative participation in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge.
  • Encourage students to create art and or compose a written response and enter these in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge before 28 September 2018.

 

Session guides, questions and activities

Session guides, discussion questions and classroom activity suggestions to help you explore this year’s theme— Our Voices, Our Future!   can be found below.

Many of our activity suggestions have been selected from the range of relevant curriculum resources featured on Reconciliation Australia’s Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning platform. Sign up to the Narragunnawali platform (it’s free) to access these curriculum resources, as well as a range of other resources and ideas to support your school to develop environments that foster a higher level of knowledge and pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and contributions.

Session guide

The tables below provide a general suggestion to help you structure lessons around the theme. A range of activities are listed below and can substituted, added to, or adapted, to suit your classroom and community context.

 Session guide 1 and 2

1

  • Begin with a class reflection and discussion about reconciliation, and  the theme Our Voices, Our Future! Consider drawing on the discussion questions outlined in Activity 1 to start your discussion.
  • Engage with Activity 1  and create a mind map based on your conversations about reconciliation and this year’s theme Our Voices, Our Future!

2

  • Explore this year’s theme Our Voices, Our Future and learn about the rich diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages across Australia.
  • Language is an important means for us to share our voices and perspectives with each other. Language is also an important medium through which culture is carried.
  • Engage with Activity 2 and discuss how the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages reflects the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, voices and perspectives more generally.
  • Encourage students to create artwork or a written reflection based on what they have learnt and discussed.
  • We particularly love to see works that demonstrate that students have learned from Aboriginal people about the languages in their local community.
  • Make sure students write an accompanying Artist’s Statement or Writer’s Reflection to be included in their Entry Form.

 Session guide 3, 4, 5 and  6 

3

  • Engaging in Activity 3 Recognise and Respect Rights supports students in developing an understanding of the importance of National and International Human Rights and Indigenous Rights frameworks as a platform for the promotion of equality, equity and ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices are heard.
  • Encourage students to engage in class discussion and write a reflection about what they have learned from participating in this activity.
  • This reflection may form the basis for the development of their creative writing or art submission. Look at Create Art or Create Writing and use the content provided to explore your chosen medium and develop an entry.

4

  • Activity 4 (below) creating postcards from the future is an excellent way to explore this years theme and could easily become some students writing and/or art entry.
  • We encourage students to be brave and imagine their ideal reconciled Australia, using creative imagery and  language.  Everything is possible!
  • This activity requires some knowledge of what reconciliation means and should follow at least one of the previous activities or a discussion based on our research and reconciliation pages.
  • These postcards may become your art entry or your writing entry.
  • Even if they don’t,  we would love to see and read them. Send them to us via email or regular mail

Schools Reconciliation Challenge

Level 1, 93 Norton St

Leichhardt NSW 2040

5

  • In Activity 5 (below) students collect a range of news articles about a local or national issue that relates to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and reconciliation. Students then compare the perspectives of the media that they have collected, and critically reflect on how these portrayals impact on their personal knowledges, thoughts, opinions and actions regarding current events and issues.
  • Encourage students to engage in class discussion and to compare and imagine who is speaking in each article and ask the question whose voices are being heard?
  • This activity can also be used as the basis for collecting facts, quotes and ideas that resonate with students for the writing activities Treasure Hunt and Erasure poetry.
  • Our resources page includes links to some articles that could be used as a starting point.

6

  • In Activity 6 (below) students are introduced to a process of truth telling. Truth-telling about past injustices has long been used as a starting point for coming to terms with a period of conflict, upheaval or injustice. These processes promote awareness of the historical and ongoing impact of past actions, and encourage all sides to forge ahead in a reconciled and peaceful way.
  • Students are encouraged to examine why truth telling and historical acceptance are important to progressing reconciliation in Australia?
  • Students also explore the importance of voice, asking themselves again; Who is doing the telling? They are also empowered in an interactive experience by changing the story.

Activity 1 Part A: Getting started with the theme – Our Voices, Our Future and reconciliation brain dance questions

  • What does the 2018 SRC theme artwork mean to you and why?
    • What stands out for you?
  • What do you notice about the colours and design of the image, and why do you think the artist chose them?
  • Who is the focus of the artwork? In what ways do you feel you relate to them?
  • What do the words Our Voices, Our Future mean to you, and why?
  • Consider how you use your own voice:
    • What do you like to talk about or feel is important to speak about?
    • What effect does the things you say and the way that you say them, have on you and the people around you have?
  • Who might “our” be referring to, and why? What do you think the significance of the repeated use of the word ‘‘our’’ is?
  • What does reconciliation mean to you?
  • Why do you think it is important to learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples languages, cultures, knowledges and perspectives?
  • Why do you think it is important to listen to the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in reconciliation processes?
  • Who are some of the people that you look up to, and feel are important to listen to? Why?
  • When you think about the future, what do you dream about for your personal future, your school’s future, your local community’s future, and/or the future of Australia, and why?
  • How can you use your voice and actions to create that future?

Activity 1 Part B: Our Voices, Our Future and reconciliation Mind Map

  • Create a mind map (a picture with words, drawings and images) that explores what you think of, or feel, when engaging with the theme Our Voices, Our Future.
    • You can draw pictures, write words, collage images and combine these all together to create your mind map.
    • You are welcome to share and discuss your mind map with your friends, teachers and families and with us by emailing your mind map to schools@nswreconciliation.org.au

Activity 2: Languages Map Activity

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning curriculum resource

Select Primary or Secondary level

Language is not merely a means of communication, it is an important medium through which culture is carried. This activity utilises a range of map representations to engage students in thinking about the languages of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across Australia and the distinct physical and socio-cultural geographies to which they belong.

Extension activity:

This map shows how NSW is made up of around 50 different Aboriginal nation, each with their own language or language group.

 

Activity: Recognising and Respecting Rights

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning curriculum resource

Select Primary or Secondary level

Recognising and respecting the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rights under the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is an important step in promoting inclusivity  equality and equity within our schools and broader communities.

Extension activities:

For further resources for Primary and Secondary students click here

For further ideas for taking action click here

 

Activity 4: Postcards from the Future

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning curriculum resource

Select Primary or Secondary level

Imagine you are living in a future Australia that has achieved reconciliation. Send a postcard to your friends and family letting them know what it’s like and how it’s different it is from what it used to be. You may even like to send the postcard to yourself in the past…

 

Activity 5 Media Portfolio Perspectives

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning curriculum resource

Select Primary or Secondary level

Understanding and critically engaging with a variety of media will help students identify current events and issues relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and reconciliation in the media.

Extension Activities:

Listen to a range of stories and interviews via our resources

Alternatively read more on Nurragunnawali News

 

Activity 6 –  K’gari

Help re-write Australia’s first ‘fake news’ with this interactive documentary produced by SBS.

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning curriculum resource

Select Primary or Secondary level

 

 

 

Teachers Click Here

This Kit was developed in consultation with the Board of Studies Teaching and Educational Standards NSW (BOSTES) to ensure that the competition meets NSW curriculum outcomes for Stages 3 & 4.

Enter by 28 September 2018

Submit Here